Tag: support

Top 10 Self Care Tips

Mental health is extremely important and often overlooked. Stress, if left unchecked, can have dangerous consequences on your mental health. That’s where our self care techniques come in!

Sometimes you just need to put yourself first. With World Mental Health Day being today, our staff wanted to share their best self care tips to get you through stressful situations.

1. Indulge in your favorite treat.

“I have found that there is nothing chocolate can’t fix. After a long day of stressful classes I like to come home and unwind with some chocolate candy or ice cream and talk about my day with my roommates. The combination of the little sugar kick and the satisfaction of treating myself really boosts my mood.” – Alexandra Lohmann, Social Media Intern

2. Take a warm bath with sea salts or bubbles.

“I like taking a warm bath and adding a bath bomb and lots of bubbles to unwind from my day and to set aside some time to relax during my busy schedule. When i’ve had a really stressful day I like to add some bath salts to soothe my muscles and get some extreme relaxation. Lighting candles provides for an added calming effect.” – Emily Salvi, M.S./E.S. Intern

3. Read a book.

“Reading a good book is a great way to relax. When I practice self care I turn to some of my favorite novels. Reading is a great way to get new perspectives, learn tips, and clear your mind. Whatever situation you’re going through, there is most definitely a book for it, so check out some self care or inspirational books. From Coping to Thriving: How to Turn Self-Care into a Way of Life is a must read.” – Danielle Shelton, Clinical Director

4. Plan a fun activity.

“I always like planning something to look forward to at the end of the week. It’s like my light at the end of the tunnel! Whether it’s looking forward to a dinner date or a get together with friends, I always try to plan something. Doing activities that I do on a normal basis are always fun, because I can look forward to that new movie coming out or my favorite treat at Starbucks to go with my coffee.” – Brandi Reisher, M.S./E.S. Intern

5. Declutter your physical space.

“Cleaning to me is therapeutic. Decluttering my space gives me such a happiness boost and an overall good feeling. I can just scrub away my stress. It’s also nice to imagine my negative emotions going out with the junk when I throw something away or take the trash out.” – Mindi Rojas, Art Therapist

6. Cook your favorite meal.

“Nutrition is very important. But, every now and then when you’re feeling down you should cook your favorite meal. Time spent cooking is time spent relaxing, and the reward at the end is definitely worth every bite. Finding a healthier alternative to your favorite meal is also something that can be fun, i.e. instead of regular spaghetti try spaghetti squash.” – Jennifer Murphy, Registered Dietitian

7. Stay away from technology.

“What better way to care for yourself than putting the phone down and going outside and getting some fresh air. It’s nice to feel connected with yourself and the best way to do that is to stay away from technology for as little as an hour or as much as the whole day. Use that time to plan your day or plan your week. The point is to focus on yourself.” – Angela Chatfield, Clinical Social Worker

8. Write in a journal.

“Writing down your feelings and emotions is beneficial to your mental health. Writing in a journal can be an outlet for some, but can also just be for fun. Emotional release from journaling lowers anxiety and stress. I use it whenever I experience an emotional blockage and writing things out helps me better understand and cope with whatever situation i’m having problems with.” – Nari Jeter, Marriage and Family Therapist

9. Go for a walk.

“Taking a walk is always my go to for clearing my mind. It’s good because you’re moving around and engaging your muscles in activity. My tip would be to walk around your neighborhood or your local park to take in the scenery. It’s a good time to think and focus on yourself.” – Karen Gibbons, Mental Health Counselor

10. Listen to your favorite music.

“Listening to music is a great self care technique. Music has many benefits such as easing stress, improving sleep, and reducing depression. Despite music being mentally beneficial, it’s also fun. So, dance around to your favorite songs and have fun with it.” – Kelly Holden, Music Therapist

Mingle – Shop – Fundraise for Eating Disorder Treatment

 

So excited to announce that my friend Jennefer Castellano Porter and I will be hosting a India Hicks Party with the BLS Team @ 1210 E Park Ave on June 21st at 5:00-7:00 pm.

The Tallahassee Community is welcome and a percentage of the contributions will be donated to Project Heal to provide treatment grants for those struggling with eating disorders!

If the party reaches $2500 in sales India Hicks will triple her contribution to Project Heal. AWESOME!!! Can’t make it to the party…that’s ok…you can shop the link online and still participate. The link is active until June 27! https://www.indiahicks.com/event/project-heal-fundraiser/shopping

Tally NEDA Walk…What A Success!

The first annual Tallahassee, Florida NEDA Walk 2017 was a huge success! Over 233 people came out to help us increase awareness of the impact that eating disorders have on our community, and together we raised $14,003.00! 100% of these funds went to the National Eating Disorders Association to further their mission of providing support to individuals and families affected by eating disorders, and to enable them to continue to serve as a catalyst for prevention, cures, and access to quality care.

We would like to give special thanks to our sponsors, Better Living Solutions, Canopy Cove, Capital Regional Behavioral Health Center, Magellan Complete Care, McCallum Place Eating Disorder Centers, Veritas Collaborative, and Aerie our national walk sponsor. We would also like to thank our vendors for coming out and supporting us: Smith Family Chiropractic, Advanced Recovery Systems, Liberty Tax Company, NAMI Tallahassee, Tallahassee Memorial Healthcare, and Sweat Therapy. In addition, our incredible donors provided us with food, drinks, and fundraising prizes: Bada Bean, Uncle Maddio’s Pizza, Maple Street Biscuit Company, Studio D, Tom and J. Leigh Brooks, Sara Marchessault, Juanita Slagle with Thirty-One Gifts, Cabello’s Salon and Spa, Saltwater Seafood Company, Axio’s Salt Spa and Juice Bar, Skateworld, The Tallahassee Museum, Hobbit American Grill, Chilis, and Red Elephant Pizza and Grill.

We would also like to thank the Lincoln High School Boys Lacrosse Team for helping us with set up and tear down; Dillion Jordan with Amplify Entertainment for providing us with energizing music; Michelle Pellito with Capital City Music Therapy, the FSU Music Therapy Association, and the FSU Art Therapy Association for putting on our drum circle and creating our “Be YOU” art board. Finally, thank you to NAMI on Campus, Sigma Delta Tau, Kappa Delta Chi, FSU’s RD’s2B, and all other volunteers who came out to help us make this such a special event.

We could not have done it all without your generosity, participation, and mutual wish to decrease the impact that eating disorders have on our community. It is by coming together as we all did that we can connect those who are struggling with the care that they need and continue to decrease the prevalence and severity of eating disorders within society as a whole.

Stay Well Tallahassee,

~Kelly Romano and the BLS TEAM!

 

 

Supporting Your Loved One Through an Eating Disorder

30 million people in the United States alone suffer from eating disorders. Taking the statistics into account, it is highly likely that this disease has afflicted someone you hold very dear, whether you are aware of it or not. They may be your best friend, your spouse, your parent or your child.

Supporting a person with an addiction is not easy, but standing with them through it is an integral part of their recovery. Instead of asking “why can’t you stop?” A better question is “how did this start?” If you can’t personally identify with having an eating disorder (ED), read on to see some simple ways you can be the support they need.

// Saying something is better than nothing at all.

It may be uncomfortable, but speaking up to this person might be exactly what they need. Instead of making an accusation, ask them questions. Cultivate a safe and comfortable atmosphere. Chances are their eating disorder will go into defense mode since it knows it’s being attacked. Be patient but persistent in the conversation.

// Be mindful of your words.

Refrain from what I call unnecessary “body talk” and specific comments about body shape and or weight, whether it’s about yourself or the person with the ED. Steer clear of mentioning calories, diets, and going in depth about specific foods. These topics can be triggering for a person with a food addiction.

// Encourage professional help.

An eating disorder is an illness manifested from deep seeded mental and emotional issues that have not been dealt with. Sometimes these issues are beyond our abilities and we don’t have the answers. Encourage your person to speak to a registered dietician. A meal plan is the most basic fundamental first step to a life in recovery.

// Don’t force it.

Recovery isn’t an option for someone who doesn’t truly want to get better. That being said, keeping someone accountable requires you to be both assertive and loving. Remind them that they are loved and have nothing to be ashamed of. Remind them that the disease is selfish, it wants their entire life. Challenge the person to separate themselves from the illness.

// Their relapse is not your failure.

Watching someone you love relapse in an addiction is incredibly difficult and disheartening. You might even become frustrated or feel responsible for their destructive choices. Be encouraged that their recovery is possible, but not contingent on you.

// A person recovering from an eating disorder is not invincible.

No matter how much time passes, an eating disorder does not disappear. A person in recovery merely chooses healthy coping mechanisms, but it’s important to stay aware that this is a cunning and baffling disease. Recovery brings freedom, though it does also mean complete insusceptibility to relapse.

// Seek support for yourself.

This is a difficult journey for you, as well. Join a support group and connect with others who’s loved ones are struggling.

// Know the facts. Educate others.

nationaleatingdisorders.org is a great place to start.

It’s not you against them; it’s us against a disease. Love the person, hate the addiction. Let’s fight it together.